The High Tie's True Identity Revealed!(warning, seriously nerdy post)

I inadvertently discovered something tonight and I have to share it.

Most grips that have been in the perms will know a knot known as the "High Tie" or at least that was the name I learned for it. I always wondered what the proper name for it was, but never enough to hunt the answer down. But tonight, YouTube answered the question I wasn't asking, and I'm super thankful.

The video was just some guy showing you the "Six Knots You Need To Know." Actually a pretty good short list, and it even includes... THE BACKHAND HITCH! Which I later learned could also be called the "Backhanded Hitch" but that's a pretty small distinction.

So I got super excited and started searching for other references to "Backhand Hitch." That search lead me to a forum for the highest order of nerds, The International Guild of Knot Tyers. There was a thread dedicated to Backhanded Hitches and a slight discrepancy in the bible of knot tying Ashley's Book of Knots(abbreviated ABoK) by Clifford Ashley. I won't go into details other than to say that there are two very different main versions of the knot listed in two separate sections of the book. ABoK #1725 shows what I would consider to be less useful method of tying the Backhand Hitch, but it shows it in a section dedicated to tying ropes off to horizontal spars(which is how we use it, only our "spar" is the handrail). Then later, in the section on tying to rings it shows method #1852 which is what I know as the "High Tie" but in a completely different context.

All that being said, it seems that the name Backhand(ed) Hitch is actually the proper name for the High Tie, but it's important to know that there are more than a few knots that go by that title even though they are similar they are drastically different.

I've included ABoK page 310, which contains the drawing of and description of #1825.